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WATER RINGS BLACK GALAXY GRANITE

HOW DO I REMOVE WATER RINGS. THE INSTALLER SAID GRANITE WAS SEALED --BUT THE WATER RINGS HAVE LEFT ME DOUBTING IT.I PURCHASED A STAIN LIFTER FOR GRANITE BUT I'M WORRIED IT WILL DAMAGE IT FURTHER. I CAN ONLY SEE THE RINGS AT A CERTAIN ANGLE. ALSO THERE ARE SMALL AREAS OF CLOUDINESS AT EDGES.
 

Dear Nathie:

Let's start by setting the record straight:

 

  1. Black Galaxy is not granite by a long shot. It is a stone called Norite of the Gabbro group. For the intents and purposes of a kitchen countertop it's a “better” stone than true granite, because it is harder and much denser. I ought to know: I have a BG countertop in my own (extremely busy) kitchen for over 10 years and it is still brand-new. However, the good ol' days when Black Galaxy was one of the surest bet in the industry are gone and forgotten. Nowadays we have selections of Black Galaxy that are disgracefully and criminally doctored. More on that later on.
  2. An impregnator (a.k.a. sealer) must be absorbed by the stone to work, because it is strictly a below-the-surface product. Considering how dense Black Galaxy is, that stone can't be technically sealed, because no sealer will ever go in. On the other hand, that stone can't be stained, because no staining agent will ever be absorbed by it. And that is the very reason why a stone like that is “better” than true geological granite.
  3. A stain, a true stain, is always darker than the stained material. If it is lighter, it's either a mark of corrosion caused by an acid (etching), or a caustic mark caused by an alkali (bleaching). There is not one single exception to this rule. Therefore the “stains” that you have are no stains at all. Since stone can't bleach, your “stains” are etch-marks (corrosion). Of course, the “stain lifting kit” is as useless is it would be useless trying to use a screwdriver to drive home a nail. If you didn't open the kit, take it back to the store and get your money back.
  4. Since a stone like Norite is resistant to most acids this side of hydrofluoric acid, it is obvious that the acid that you spilled (a drink, lemon juice, slad dressing, vinegar, the wrong cleaning product, etc. through a long list) corroded something else, other than the stone. In fact, it corroded the malicious “shoe-shine: that was applied by the factory to turn their gray Black Galaxy into a “black” Black Galaxy! That is called malicious doctoring and it a full fledged criminal activity that constitute consumer fraud. The sealing that your fabricator claims to have made (I'm sure that they did apply an impregnator to your stone, believing that's granite, but that doesn't mean that they sealed it) would be totally useless to prevent these type of “stains”, since they are actual damages to – in this case – the doctoring agent that the factory slapped on your stone.

 

Now that we set the record straight, let see what your options are. Not many, really. You have to demand the replacement of your countertop with a good-grade true Black Galaxy, or else! You can't compromise, because there's absolutely nothing that can be done to make your stone turn from what it is not into what it should be. True Black Galaxy is among the most bullet-proof, care-free stone that money can buy. You can throw anything at it but you won't be able to even tickle it!!

Marblecleaning.org is collecting cases histories of this criminal activity and we could help you with your case, should it come to that. Why don't you start by printing this out and show it to your fabricator?

I would also suggest you to send a copy of this to your attorney, just in case, and to show the fabricator that you mean business.

If that won't do, get back in touch with me and we'll discuss your course of action.

In the meantime…

 

May I ask you now to please read and e-sign our Statement of Purpose at: http://www.marblecleaning.org/purpose.htm?   :-)

Ciao and good luck,

Mauri z io Bertoli

 

www.marblecleaning.org – The Only Consumers' Portal to the Stone Industry Establishment!
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